Following the trend towards comprehensive state consumer data privacy laws over the past half decade, five more states—New Jersey, New Hampshire, Kentucky, Nebraska, and Maryland—have passed their own such laws since the beginning of this year alone. Joining the ranks of California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Iowa, Montana, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia, these five states bring the total number of states with comprehensive state privacy laws to 17 (or 19, if you count more narrowly scoped privacy laws in Florida and Nevada), a near 50% increase in states with comprehensive privacy laws in only five months. New Jersey led the charge at the beginning of 2024, with Governor Phil Murphy signing the New Jersey Privacy Act (NJPA) on January 16. Next followed New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu’s signature on SB 255 (acronym surely soon to follow). Kentucky (KCDPA) and Nebraska (NDPA) were next, signing laws on April 4 and 17, respectively, and Maryland rounded out this wave of privacy legislation when Governor Wes Moore signed the Maryland Online Data Privacy Act of 2024 (MODPA) into law on May 9.Continue Reading Five State Privacy Laws in Five Months

In a Bloomberg Law article, attorneys examined Washington State’s comprehensive new privacy law, the My Health My Data Act, the first state law that specifically safeguards consumer health data.

The article discusses the new law’s scope, applicability, and ensuing company obligations. The Act will apply to many life sciences companies, pharmaceutical and device

Following up on announcements of sweeps from late January, last week California Attorney General Rob Bonta announced a settlement with the popular food delivery service DoorDash related to allegations that DoorDash breached the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the California Online Privacy Protection Act (CalOPPA). The announcement doubles down on the Attorney General’s reiteration that privacy will continue to be priority for his office, while the new California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) is getting up to speed.Continue Reading DoorDash and California Attorney General Reach Settlement Over Privacy Allegations

On February 9, 2024, a California state court of appeal unanimously vacated a lower court ruling, green-lighting the California Privacy Protection Agency’s authority to commence enforcement of the Agency’s first set of regulations. Until now, the Agency’s authority to enforce regulations it has promulgated under the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) has been delayed. The Agency had been poised to begin enforcing its latest batch of completed privacy regulations on July 1, 2023, but a trial court’s ruling put this work on hold until March 29, 2024. That hold has now evaporated, and so the Agency can commence enforcement activities with immediate effect. The decision also impacts future Agency rulemaking such as the Agency’s draft regulations on cybersecurity audits, privacy impact assessments, and automated decision-making, which will no longer be subject to the 12-month stay of enforcement.Continue Reading California Court of Appeal Restores CPPA Authority to Enforce Privacy Regulations

Decisions, decisions.  We are deluged by decisions.  What present should I buy?  Is the small cheese plate enough for my party guests, or should I go with the large?  How much of my bonus should I set aside for retirement this year, or should I up my charitable giving? 

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could all get a little technological assistance in making choices this holiday season?Continue Reading Jingle All the Algorithms: Automated Decisionmaking Amidst a Blizzard of State Privacy Laws

On November 13, 2023, New York Governor Kathy Hochul announced the release of proposed statewide hospital cybersecurity regulations that would require state-licensed hospitals to establish cybersecurity programs, policies and procedures (the “Proposed Regulations”). The Proposed Regulations feature requirements regarding cybersecurity policies and procedures, personnel, user authentication methods, security risk assessments, incident response plans, and two-hour

At its Sept. 8 board meeting, the California Privacy Protection Agency reviewed draft regulations addressing cybersecurity audits and risk assessments. If adopted, the proposed regulations would require many businesses already subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act to conduct new, independent audits of their cybersecurity programs.  The proposed regulations would also impose broad rules

Last week, Delaware Governor John Carney signed into law the Delaware Personal Data Privacy Act (“DPDPA”), the state’s new consumer privacy law that will become effective January 1, 2025. The First State is now the 12th state to fully enact a comprehensive consumer data privacy law, joining California, Colorado, Connecticut, Indiana, Iowa, Montana, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia. Our previous posts on laws in those states can be found here. Though the DPDPA generally tracks consumer privacy laws in other states—particularly those in Colorado, Connecticut, and Oregon—it does contain nuances that organizations should note, particularly a lack of general exclusions for nonprofits and higher education institutions as well as a lower threshold for applicability.Continue Reading Delaware Becomes Twelfth State to Pass Consumer Privacy Law

With the onslaught of state privacy laws passed earlier this spring and summer, the Texas Data Privacy and Security Act (the “TDPSA”) signed into law on June 18, 2023, may not have received its due.  Although largely following the template set in other states, the Texas law is unique among the non-California comprehensive privacy laws in tying its scoping criteria to the size of a business rather than to a threshold number of data subjects whose information a business processes annually—typically 100,000 state residents.  The company must also (1) conduct business in Texas or produce a product or service consumed in the state and (2) process or “sell” personal data (more on the definition of “sell” below, which would include many disclosures made through online advertising).  As a result, many mid-market businesses that process smaller amounts of data (falling under the 100,000-resident threshold applicable in many states) could still be required to comply.Continue Reading Texas Data Privacy and Security Act Could Impact More Businesses

Just before the July 4th holiday, the California Superior Court in Sacramento gave businesses struggling to comply with the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) a small gift by delaying enforcement of the CPRA’s regulations until March of 2024 at the earliest. While helpful in some respects, discussed below, the ruling does not expressly prohibit the California Privacy Protection Agency (“Agency”) from enforcing the underlying text of the CPRA where implementing regulations are not required. Ashkan Soltani, the executive director of the Agency, has been quoted as stating that “significant portions” of the law can still be enforced immediately. 

In short, businesses should not assume the Agency will remain idle. CPRA compliance remains a priority, though the Agency has indicated that enforcement is likely to proceed slowly at first—given staffing shortages at the Agency—with an initial emphasis on voluntary compliance. Further clarity on the Agency’s enforcement plans may be forthcoming on July 14, when the Agency is scheduled to hold a board meeting featuring Michael Macko, the Agency’s Deputy Director of Enforcement, who will provide an update on the Agency’s enforcement priorities.Continue Reading Enforcement of CPRA Regulations Delayed, but CPRA Compliance Still a Priority