Following up on announcements of sweeps from late January, last week California Attorney General Rob Bonta announced a settlement with the popular food delivery service DoorDash related to allegations that DoorDash breached the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the California Online Privacy Protection Act (CalOPPA). The announcement doubles down on the Attorney General’s reiteration that privacy will continue to be priority for his office, while the new California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) is getting up to speed.Continue Reading DoorDash and California Attorney General Reach Settlement Over Privacy Allegations

On February 9, 2024, a California state court of appeal unanimously vacated a lower court ruling, green-lighting the California Privacy Protection Agency’s authority to commence enforcement of the Agency’s first set of regulations. Until now, the Agency’s authority to enforce regulations it has promulgated under the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) has been delayed. The Agency had been poised to begin enforcing its latest batch of completed privacy regulations on July 1, 2023, but a trial court’s ruling put this work on hold until March 29, 2024. That hold has now evaporated, and so the Agency can commence enforcement activities with immediate effect. The decision also impacts future Agency rulemaking such as the Agency’s draft regulations on cybersecurity audits, privacy impact assessments, and automated decision-making, which will no longer be subject to the 12-month stay of enforcement.Continue Reading California Court of Appeal Restores CPPA Authority to Enforce Privacy Regulations

On March 29, 2023, the California Office of Administrative Law (the “OAL”) approved the first substantive set of California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) regulations from the California Privacy Protection Agency (the “CPPA”), which we addressed in a previous blog. Those regulations went into effect immediately. As discussed in a recent episode of Ropes & Gray’s privacy podcast, The Data Day, the CPPA has also begun consideration of an additional set of regulations that would implement other CPRA requirements, issuing an Invitation for Preliminary Comments on Proposed Rulemaking Cybersecurity Audits, Risk Assessments, and Automated Decisionmaking. Enforcement of the CPRA, including its implementing regulations, is scheduled to begin on July 1, 2023. However, on March 30, 2023—just one day after the OAL approved the CPPA’s regulations—the California Chamber of Commerce announced that it had filed suit in Sacramento Superior Court seeking to delay enforcement until 12 months after a final and complete set of regulations has been adopted.Continue Reading California Finalizes Privacy Regulations: Enforcement Scheduled to Begin in July 2023

Just in time for Data Privacy Day, the California attorney general (“California AG”) announced a new round of privacy investigations targeting the retail, travel, and food service industries.  The investigative sweep will focus on “popular apps” that allegedly fail to honor consumer requests to opt out of the “sale” of their personal information.  The sweep will also review responses to requests sent on behalf of consumers by authorized agents such as the “Permission Slip” application developed by Consumer Reports.  Even with the considerable attention owed to the new requirements of the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”)—which amends and expands on the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”)—along with the significant recent activity by the California Privacy Protection Agency, businesses should not overlook their ongoing obligations to comply with the CCPA prior to the CPRA’s enforcement beginning on July 1, 2023.Continue Reading California AG Announces New CCPA Sweep

In 2022, children’s online privacy and safety has been top of mind in many state legislatures and interest groups, and the California legislature successfully passed legislation focused on children’s privacy. California’s new bipartisan law (AB-2273), the California Age-Appropriate Design Code Act (“CAADCA”), which targets privacy and safety protections for children and teens on online platforms such as TikTok, Instagram, and YouTube, was signed by Governor Gavin Newsom on September 15, 2022, and goes into effect July 1, 2024.Continue Reading California’s New Children’s Privacy Law is Set to Come into Effect in 2024

At a meeting of the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA”) on June 8, we learned additional information about the initial batch of proposed regulations (“Proposed Regulations”) to the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) that were published on May 27. The Proposed Regulations keep much of the pre-existing California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) regulations but modify and add some key provisions. Because the CPRA was drafted as an amendment to the CCPA, the Proposed Regulations reference the CCPA (as amended by the CPRA). The Proposed Regulations focus on data subject rights, contractual requirements, and obligations related to disclosures, notices, and consents. Additional proposals will cover cybersecurity audits, privacy risk assessments, and automated decision making, among other areas. While we expect significant changes as the Proposed Regulations proceed through the formal rulemaking process, which the CPPA has not yet officially started, we provide our key takeaways below:Continue Reading Recent Activity from the California Privacy Protection Agency

The California Attorney General’s office (OAG) recently released its first formal written opinion on the scope of the rights granted to consumers under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), specifically, the right for a consumer to know about the personal information that a business collects from them. The opinion comes in response to a question submitted by California Assembly member Kevin Kiley as to whether a consumer’s right to know the specific pieces of personal information that a business has collected about that consumer applies to internally generated inferences the business holds about them. The OAG asserted that the right to know does apply to such inferences, albeit with certain key exceptions.
Continue Reading California Attorney General’s Office Releases First Formal CCPA Opinion

As 2021 comes to a close, it is a great time to take stock of the present state of affairs with respect to U.S. privacy laws. With the relatively recent passage of comprehensive privacy laws in California, and additional countries adopting laws that closely follow the principles of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), along with increasing public concerns regarding how companies manage customers’ personal data, legal practitioners entered 2021 with high hopes that comprehensive federal privacy legislation may finally be on the horizon. Nevertheless, in a trend that is likely to continue in the year ahead, it was the states rather than federal legislatures that successfully added to the ranks of privacy laws with which businesses will soon need to comply.
Continue Reading Momentum Builds for State Privacy Laws but the Possibility of a Federal Law Remains Remote

The Future of US Federal and State Regulation of Data Privacy

During the November 3rd session of Ropes & Gray’s conference, “The Future of Global Data Protection: Conflict or Coherence?” Ropes & Gray partner Chong Park moderated a discussion with Ropes & Gray’s data protection partner Fran Faircloth and Minh Ta, Vice President of Global Governmental Affairs at the Carlyle Group regarding the future of federal and state regulation of data privacy in the United States.

The group all agreed that there should be a comprehensive, US federal data privacy law, but expressed opposing views on the likelihood of such a federal law being implemented in the near future. Minh analogized it to the infrastructure bill debate in the United States, noting that there is bipartisan consensus to address the issue on some level, but the problem lies in the details—i.e., what specifically should be regulated is where people disagree. Fran, on the other hand, expressed a bit more optimism that a federal law on privacy would be passed in the future, but agreed the likelihood of imminent passage is unlikely. She noted that as more states pass their own versions of privacy laws, that eventually as a result a federal law would be passed.Continue Reading The Future of US Federal and State Regulation of Data Privacy

Preeminent privacy scholar and George Washington University Law School professor, Daniel Solove joined Ropes & Gray’s virtual conference on “The Future of Global Data Protection,” for a wide-ranging discussion with Edward McNicholas, co-leader of the Ropes & Gray data, privacy & cybersecurity practice, in which the pair explored:

  • The state of complexity and inconsistency in the international privacy law landscape
  • The inherent flaws in the models on which privacy laws are currently based
  • The risks of moving toward a regulatory model
  • Theories of harm in data breach cases
  • The role of the courts in adjudicating privacy laws

Please see below for an overview of some of these topics, or to access a recording of the session please visit our blog: RopesDataPhiles.Continue Reading How Data Breaches Are Shaping the Global Data Protection Debate