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Following the trend towards comprehensive state consumer data privacy laws over the past half decade, five more states—New Jersey, New Hampshire, Kentucky, Nebraska, and Maryland—have passed their own such laws since the beginning of this year alone. Joining the ranks of California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Iowa, Montana, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia, these five states bring the total number of states with comprehensive state privacy laws to 17 (or 19, if you count more narrowly scoped privacy laws in Florida and Nevada), a near 50% increase in states with comprehensive privacy laws in only five months. New Jersey led the charge at the beginning of 2024, with Governor Phil Murphy signing the New Jersey Privacy Act (NJPA) on January 16. Next followed New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu’s signature on SB 255 (acronym surely soon to follow). Kentucky (KCDPA) and Nebraska (NDPA) were next, signing laws on April 4 and 17, respectively, and Maryland rounded out this wave of privacy legislation when Governor Wes Moore signed the Maryland Online Data Privacy Act of 2024 (MODPA) into law on May 9.Continue Reading Five State Privacy Laws in Five Months

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has issued its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) to establish the first cross-sectoral federal cybersecurity incident and ransomware payment reporting system.

As noted in an alert in March 2022, President Biden signed the Cyber Incident Reporting for Critical Infrastructure Act of 2022 (CIRCIA) into law just over two

The FCC has issued a declaratory ruling, employing the protection of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) to outlaw robocalls that use AI-generated voices. The Commission’s unanimous decision was spurred by public fallout from the doctored audio message of a purported President Biden urging voters in New Hampshire not to vote in the state’s Democratic primary last month. The announcement makes clear that the potential for malicious actors to use AI to deceive voters and subvert democratic processes is on the government’s top-of-mind this election year. This is not the first time that the TCPA has been used to protect the public from election interference, but rather than go after individual actors for individual instances of election interference as it has in the past, this decision creates a much wider blanket ban on AI-generated voices in robocalls which will cover election-related AI-generated calls among others.Continue Reading 2024 Is Set To Be Democracy and Deepfakes’ Biggest Year. Is U.S. Legislation …Ready For It?

Merck’s settlement last week over its $1.4 billion claim tied to a 2017 Russian-linked “NotPetya” cyberattack leaves a major question in cybersecurity and international law anything but settled – can a “cyberattack” ever be considered an “attack” under the international laws of war? The insurance dispute is hardly the first time cybersecurity has been linked to nation-state security – as far back as 2014, China’s now President Xi Jinping declared that “without cybersecurity there is no national security” – but how did a major pharmaceutical chain’s insurance claim become a potential battleground for litigating the definition of war in the 21st century?Continue Reading Merck Insurance Settlement Leaves Debate over Cyberwar and Cyberinsurance Unsettled

Looking back on 2023, the trend of privacy-based class actions has only increased, and it doesn’t seem poised to halt or even slow down in the new year. Businesses are feeling acutely the threat of future litigation. At the end of 2022, the hundreds of cross-industry respondents to the Annual Litigation Trends Survey cited cybersecurity, data protection, and data privacy as the second-highest ranked area of future concern for class actions, and their concerns turned out to be justified. From peeved Pixel plaintiffs to data breach defendants, class actions abounded this year.Continue Reading Dashing Through 2023’s Privacy Litigation Trends

On June 24, 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, overturning Roe v. Wade and holding that there is no constitutionally protected right to abortion. The significance of the decision cannot be overstated. Dobbs not only rolled back the Court’s prior protection of reproductive rights, it also raised still-unanswered questions about the privacy of digital data and could lead to the overturning of other previous Court opinions that are similarly grounded in privacy interests. In sparking such questions, Dobbs appears to have reinvigorated a national conversation regarding the protection of personal information and, more generally, the need for stronger data privacy safeguards in the United States.Continue Reading Four Months after Dobbs, Privacy Concerns Remain in the Spotlight