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Following the trend towards comprehensive state consumer data privacy laws over the past half decade, five more states—New Jersey, New Hampshire, Kentucky, Nebraska, and Maryland—have passed their own such laws since the beginning of this year alone. Joining the ranks of California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Iowa, Montana, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia, these five states bring the total number of states with comprehensive state privacy laws to 17 (or 19, if you count more narrowly scoped privacy laws in Florida and Nevada), a near 50% increase in states with comprehensive privacy laws in only five months. New Jersey led the charge at the beginning of 2024, with Governor Phil Murphy signing the New Jersey Privacy Act (NJPA) on January 16. Next followed New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu’s signature on SB 255 (acronym surely soon to follow). Kentucky (KCDPA) and Nebraska (NDPA) were next, signing laws on April 4 and 17, respectively, and Maryland rounded out this wave of privacy legislation when Governor Wes Moore signed the Maryland Online Data Privacy Act of 2024 (MODPA) into law on May 9.Continue Reading Five State Privacy Laws in Five Months

On this episode of the R&G Tech Studio podcast, managing principal and global head of advanced E-Discovery and A.I. strategy Shannon Capone Kirk sits down with data, privacy & cybersecurity partner Fran Faircloth to discuss how new and ever-evolving technology is impacting her clients, particularly generative AI, and the challenges that arise in litigation and

On March 13, 2024, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) announced that it had opened an investigation into the monumental cyberattack on Change Healthcare (“Change”), a unit of UnitedHealth Group (“UHG”). The attack is one of the largest assaults against the U.S. health care system, with far-reaching

On April 24, President Biden signed a sweeping foreign aid bill into law, which included a critical provision covering privacy and data transfers known as the Protecting Americans’ Data from Foreign Adversaries Act (“PADFA”). This Act is separate from the TikTok divestment portion of the legislation, which has received far greater attention in the press. 

On February 26, 2024, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”) released version 2.0 of its Cybersecurity Framework (“CSF 2.0”)—the first significant update to the cybersecurity guidance since its initial publication a decade ago.[1] While the original guidance was tailored to critical infrastructure entities, the new version has a broader scope and applies to organizations of all sizes across industries, from large corporations with robust data protection infrastructure to small schools and nonprofits that may lack cybersecurity sophistication.[2] CSF 2.0 notably incorporates new sections on corporate governance responsibilities and supply chain risks; additionally, NIST has released supplemental implementation guides and reference tools that can assist organizations measure cybersecurity practices and hone data protection priorities.[3]Continue Reading NIST Publishes Long-Awaited Cybersecurity Framework 2.0

On February 28, 2024, President Biden announced an Executive Order directing the Department of Justice to promulgate regulations that restrict or prohibit transactions involving certain bulk sensitive personal data or United States Government-related data and countries of concern or covered persons. The DOJ’s initially identified countries are China (including Hong Kong and Macau), Russia, Iran

Following up on announcements of sweeps from late January, last week California Attorney General Rob Bonta announced a settlement with the popular food delivery service DoorDash related to allegations that DoorDash breached the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the California Online Privacy Protection Act (CalOPPA). The announcement doubles down on the Attorney General’s reiteration that privacy will continue to be priority for his office, while the new California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) is getting up to speed.Continue Reading DoorDash and California Attorney General Reach Settlement Over Privacy Allegations

The FCC has issued a declaratory ruling, employing the protection of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) to outlaw robocalls that use AI-generated voices. The Commission’s unanimous decision was spurred by public fallout from the doctored audio message of a purported President Biden urging voters in New Hampshire not to vote in the state’s Democratic primary last month. The announcement makes clear that the potential for malicious actors to use AI to deceive voters and subvert democratic processes is on the government’s top-of-mind this election year. This is not the first time that the TCPA has been used to protect the public from election interference, but rather than go after individual actors for individual instances of election interference as it has in the past, this decision creates a much wider blanket ban on AI-generated voices in robocalls which will cover election-related AI-generated calls among others.Continue Reading 2024 Is Set To Be Democracy and Deepfakes’ Biggest Year. Is U.S. Legislation …Ready For It?

Looking back on 2023, the trend of privacy-based class actions has only increased, and it doesn’t seem poised to halt or even slow down in the new year. Businesses are feeling acutely the threat of future litigation. At the end of 2022, the hundreds of cross-industry respondents to the Annual Litigation Trends Survey cited cybersecurity, data protection, and data privacy as the second-highest ranked area of future concern for class actions, and their concerns turned out to be justified. From peeved Pixel plaintiffs to data breach defendants, class actions abounded this year.Continue Reading Dashing Through 2023’s Privacy Litigation Trends